Realted Problems

  1. Seat Belts Detatch During Crash

    Cars these days have airbags, sensors, crumple zones, tempered glass, and other safety features. But the OG, and arguably the most important, safety feature is the seat belt. Only trouble is, Hyundai's seem to be detatching from the body of…

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    We know there's more problems than this. Let us know which one you'd like to see us cover next.

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Related News

There's a lot of news out there, but not all of it matters. We try to boil down it to the most important bits about things that actually help you with your car problem. Interested in getting these stories in an email? Signup for free email alerts over at CarComplaints.com.

  1. Hyundai thought it could manage EV battery fires with some software updates, but then one of the "repaired" vehicles caught on fire.

    So now the company finds itself staring down the barrel of an all-out battery replacement program for 76,000 Kona EVs worldwide (that's a $900 million dollar barrel, FWIW).

    Also included are some Ioniq EVs and Electric City buses that have also run the risk of being torched. The recall will begin in South Korea before expanding to other countries. There is no official word on a North American recall, but it's only a matter of time.…

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  2. Owners of the 3rd generation Tucson (2016-2021) are being urged to keep their parked vehicles away from anything that can burn until they have a fuse in the antilock braking system (ABS) replaced.

    If you're wondering if they really mean that, yes. Yes they do Multiple SUVs have caught on fire, both while parked and in motion, due to a short circuit in the ABS.

    An investigation found that the fires may not occur if the operating current in the ABS module traveled through a lower amperage fuse so they want to swap the system's current 40-amp fuse for a 25-amp version. I'd personally like a little more certainty than "may not occur," but that's just me.…

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  3. The 1st generation Veracruz (2007-2012) has been recalled a second time to fix oil sneaking past defects in a valve cover gasket and damaging the alternator.

    The oil-soaked alternator will lose voltage, leading to problems such as the battery system not properly charging or the vehicle entering "limp home" mode while driving.

    Only 83% of the vehicles originally recalled were ever repaired and of those roughly 1% of the vehicles suffered from gasket leaks about two years later. Hyundai extended the warranty for the 60,000 affected vehicles hoping that would be enough, but the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) ordered them to recall the problem ... again.

    The recall (#197) is expected to begin on January 8th, 2021.

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  4. Hyundai is recalling 11,000 Kona Electric SUVs and asking the owners to park outside after reports of 13 battery fires.

    Hyundai believes an electrical short-circuit is being triggered in the lithium-ion batteries as they charge and approach 100%. Most of the fires happened while the SUVs were parked and charging. While the root cause is still under investigation, electrical deficiencies in the LG batteries or software issues in the battery management software are likely to blame.

    More About This Recall

    • In March, Hyundai issued a Kona Electric service campaign to upgrade the battery management system software to detect abnormalities in the battery while the vehicle is parked. But over the last 7 months an additional 7 fires were reported.
    • Now an interim repair will limit the battery's maximum charging capacity to 90%, which removes the risk of fires but will limit the owner's range until a more permanent solution is available.
    • Recall #196 expected to begin in Devember 2020. Because of the nature of the recall, Hyundai strongly emphasizes that owners need to park outside and away from any structures that could catch on fire.
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  5. Knock, knock – there’s a major defect in the 2013 Velostar’s engine management software.

    A defect that manages to find a way to prematurely ignite the air/fuel mixture in 1.6-liter turbo engines. This puts way too much pressure on the cylinders resulting in knocking noises, stalling incidents, and engine fires. The 16,500 recalled vehicles will get the same software update given to 2014 owners, which Hyundai says improved these conditions.

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  6. Hyundai is recalling 120,000 Tucson SUVs because their oil pans can leak, damaging the engine or starting fires.

    The automaker says there’s a problem with the sealant they used for the 2011-2013 model years. Common warning signs include oil pools on the ground, knocking engine noises, the smell of oil burning on hot engine parts, a smoldering wall of flames coming out of your engine. You know, subtle stuff like that.

    Hyundai plans on sending out recall notices by the end of March 2019.

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  7. Hyundai is recalling nearly 100,000 engines with fuel tubes that were misaligned, improperly tightened, or otherwise damaged during installation.

    This lets gas can spray out onto hot surfaces and is the **perfect recipe for engine fires. It gets worse.

    This was supposed to be Hyundai’s opportunity to right the wrongs of their gasoline direct injection engines with massive oil flow problems. Those engines were notorious for knocking, seizing, and were eventually recalled in multiple campaigns. These were the replacements and now because of an installation snafu they’re catching on fire.…

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  8. A sunroof isn’t supposed to close when it detects an object in the way.

    However there’s an issue in the way the 2018 Elantra GT’s sunroof motor was programmed that could turn it into a slow, dull, but strong guillotine.

    The system won't detect if a finger, head or other objects are in the way of the closing glass and won't immediately retract.

    Resist the urge to stick your head out of the sunroof until the recall begins in February 2019. Actually, just go ahead and resist that urge in general.

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  9. The 2018 Santa Fe Sport already has an airbag recall.

    The side curtain airbag probably won't deploy properly to be able to protect an occupant. In addition, Hyundai says it can't guarantee the detached diffuser will remain in the airbag, and if it doesn't, occupants could be harmed by the projectile.

    This is the same problem affecting Kia and Ford vehicles. The affected SUVs were built between 09/05/17 and 11/30/17.

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  10. A previous brake switch recall has been expanded to include over 390,000 Elantras from the 2013 and 2014 model years.

    Hyundai noticed an increased warranty claim rate for Elantras that weren't included in the 2016 recall. Brake pedal stopper pads were collected from the vehicles that were built between 2012 and 2014.

    The brake pedal stopper pad sits between the brake light switch and the brake pedal arm. Hyundai issued a recall last year after discovering the stopper pad was deteriorating, allowing the brake lights to stay on even when the pedal wasn’t being pressed.

    Turns out that recall didn’t reach far enough.

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  11. Back in March, Hyundai recalled 978,000 cars to inspect and fix seat belt linkages and the pretensioner.

    Now those vehicles have been recalled again for the same problems.

    Although the condition of a partially latched anchor pretensioner was fixed through the recall campaign, the condition could potentially happen again if the anchor pretensioner was intentionally disconnected and then improperly reconnected by consumers or repair facilities.

    After the first recall Hyundai and their supplier talked with NHTSA about possible problems from the recall repairs.

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  12. The 2018 Santa Fe Sport has been recalled for suspension issues

    , although most of the affected vehicles haven’t been sold yet. Hyundai is recalling about 200 model year 2018 Santa Fe Sport SUVs at risk of losing control while on the roads.

    The automaker says the front coil springs may not have been manufactured correctly and can break under certain loads. This is another in a long-line of manufacturing issues for Hyundai. The automaker is still dealing with manufacturing issues in the Theta II engine that have forced multiple recalls.

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  13. **Hy

    ndai has announced a recall of certain 2017 Santa Fe SUVs with 3.3-liter engines. The automaker says the crankshaft assemblies may have been manufactured with irregularities in the crankshaft pins, something that can cause the engine bearings to wear down. If the SUV continues to be driven with a worn engine bearing, the engine could become damaged to the point of stalling.

    Hyundai is blaming the problem on a heat treatment coil that wasn’t in the right place during manufacturing from January 26, 2017 to February 13, 2017. This led to insufficient heat treatment on the pins.

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  14. The 2017 Ioniq EV is being recalled for stalling out.

    Hyundai is recalling 218 model year Ioniq Electric cars that can stall while driving because problems occurred during manufacturing of certain parts.

    Antifreeze is entering small voids in the Ioniq’s electronic power control unit (EPCU), shorting the circuit board and causing the car to stall.

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  15. Hyundai is recalling the 2017 Santa Fe Sport because the seat belts can detach in a crash. Talk about defeating the purpose.

    The latest recall includes 2017 Santa Fe Sport SUVs to fix issues with the driver's side seat belt anchors that may not have been tightened properly during assembly. Bolts that aren't tight enough may cause the seat belts to detach from the anchors during a crash.

    In case you missed it, the same vehicles were recently recalled for hoods flying open while driving. The 2017 Santa Fe sounds like a real hoot to drive.

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  16. The bad news: the Santa Fe (and Sport) have hoods that can fly open and need to be recalled.

    The good news: this is an issue with the secondary latch, which is basically your safety net in case the primary latch fails.

    Hyundai says the 2013-2017 Santa Fe and Santa Fe Sport SUVs have secondary hood latch actuating cables that can corrode and bind, causing the secondary latch to stay unlatched when the hood is closed.

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  17. Hyundai is recalling 161,000 cars for issues with parking brake switch issues.

    According to Hyundai, the warning light used to indicate when the parking brake is applied may not illuminate due to corrosion of the parking brake switch. This could cause a driver to possibly leave the parking brake engaged while trying to drive the car.

    The affected cars are from the 2015 and 2016 model years.

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  18. Federal investigators are taking a look at Hyundai’s handling of Theta II engine recalls to make sure there’s no funny business going on.

    NHTSA says it took action to "investigate both the timeliness and scope of Hyundai's Theta II engine recalls, and Hyundai's compliance with reporting requirements.

    Timely and compliant? Not if you ask this lawsuit. Or this former Hyundai engineer. To date, nearly 1.7 million Hyundai and Kia vehicles have been recalled.

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  19. Hyundai is issuing a small recall for a big problem if you’re a fan of power steering.

    The automaker says damaged electronic power steering connectors are the cause of the problem, a problem that won't be fun if it happens while driving at slow speeds or around a curve.

    The recall is expected to begin soon.

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  20. 572,000 Sonata and Santa Fe Sport vehicles are being recalled because the Theta II engines can seize at any moment.

    Hyundai says machining errors occurred when the engines were built and those errors can cause the engine bearings to wear out early. Those prematurely worn bearings will cause the engine to lock up, something a dealer will need to fix by replacing the engine short block.

    Hyundai admits that two errors made during manufacturing are responsible for this problem.…

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